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Tag: streaming

Reading the Tea Leaves on PlayStation 4 Announcement

Sony’s announcement of the PlayStation 4 today has gotten a wide array of responses from the internet (including, amusingly, dismay at the fact that Sony never actually showed the console itself). What was interesting to me was less the console itself but what is revealed about the tech industry in the pretty big changes Sony made over the PlayStation’s previous incarnations. They give a sign of things to come as we await the “XBox 720” (or whatever they call it), Valve’s “Steambox” console, and (what I ultimately think will prevail) the next generation of mobile platform-based consoles like Green Throttle.

  • Sony switched to a more standard PC technology architecture over its old custom supercomputer-like Cell architecture. This is probably due to the increasingly ridiculous costs of putting together custom chips as well as the difficulties for developers in writing software for exotic hardware: Verge link
  • New controller that includes new interface modalities which capture some of the new types of user experiences that users have grown accustomed to from the mobile world (touch, motion) and from Microsoft’s wildly successful Kinect product via their “Eye Camera” (2 1280×800 f/2.0 cameras with 4 channel microphone array): Verge link
  • Strong emphasis during the announcement on streaming cloud gameplay: It looks like Sony is trying to make the most of its $380M acquisition of Gaikai to
    • demo service letting users try the full versions of the games immediately as opposed to after downloading a large, not always available demo
    • drive instant play for downloaded games (because you can stream the game from the cloud while it downloads in the background)
    • provide support for games for the PS3/2/1 without dedicated hardware (and maybe even non-PlayStation games on the platform?)

    Verge link

  • Focus on more social interactions via saving/streaming/uploading video of gameplay: the success of sites like Machinima hint at the types of social engagement that console gamers enjoy. So given the push in the mobile/web gaming world to “social”, it makes perfect sense for Sony to embrace this (so much so that apparently Sony will have dedicated hardware to support video compression/recording/uploading in the background) even if it means support for third party services like UStream (Verge link)
  • Second screen interactivity: The idea of the console as the be-all-end-all site of experience is now thoroughly dead. According to the announcement, the PlayStation 4 includes the ability to “stream” gameplay to handheld PlayStation Vitas (Verge link) as well as the ability to deliver special content/functionality that goes alongside content to iOS/Android phones and tablets (Verge link). A lot of parallels to Microsoft’s XBox Smart Glass announcement last year and the numerous guys trying to put together a second screen experience for TVs and set-top boxes

Regardless of if the PS4 succeeds, these are interesting changes from Sony’s usual extremely locked-down, heavily customized MO and while there are still plenty of details to be described, I think it shows just how much the rise of horizontal platforms, the boom in mobile, the maturation of the cloud as a content delivery platform, and the importance of social engagement have pervaded every element of the tech industry.

(Update: as per Pat Miller’s comments, I’ve corrected some of the previous statements I made about the PlayStation 4’s use of Gaikai technology)

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Streaming Music Lockers

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I was lucky enough to receive early access to Google’s Music Beta service, the new streaming music service Google announced at their recent Google I/O event. It’s a service that’s fairly similar to Amazon’s Cloud Drive and the streaming service which Apple is rumored to be announcing soon. I’ve used the service for about two weeks, and I have to confess I’m confused as to why everyone is so excited about this.

Let me be clear: I think the service works perfectly fine. I, of course, have some complaints. The web interface, at least not to my knowledge, doesn’t provide a simple way to play or queue individual songs without queuing up the next song in the list. There can also be an awkward buffering pause at the start of playback (although I’ve noticed the software intelligently pre-caches the next song in the list) which can also be a little annoying. And, on my super-slow connection, it took two days to upload my music collection (whereas its been rumored that Apple will simply identify the song and pull it from its own collection). But, overall, I’ve been impressed with the quality. The quality of the playback across all of my devices (including my smartphone even when its not on WiFi) is good, and the ability to easily sync playlists across all of my devices is a nice touch. The free music. The instant playlists and integration with my Android devices are also thoughtful touches.

But my confusion has nothing to do with whether or not the service works: its whether or not this service is actually all that valuable to a large swath of users. While I have a relatively large music collection, I (and I’m willing to bet most people) don’t add to that collection all that often. When you couple that with the fact that storage is pretty cheap (as anyone who bought a USB stick and looked at the prices again 6 months later has noticed), it makes it easy to manage your music collection between your computer and your phone with iTunes or Windows Media Player without Apple or Google or Amazon going through the hassle of setting up an elaborate cloud setup.

For someone like me with four separate devices (a personal laptop, a work laptop, a DROID2 smartphone, and a tablet), this becomes a little more interesting as synching between all four can be a pain, but I don’t know how many people fall into that category. And, even if they did, music services like Mog, Spotify, and Grooveshark offer essentially the same thing – streaming music – except without the limitations of what’s in your own music collection.

Obviously, there are things Amazon, Google, and Apple are doing which are better than good-old-fashioned-manual-synching and what the Mogs/Spotifys/Groovesharks of the world have built. And, if its not clear yet, I do think these services are cool and valuable. But my view here is that they’re not so much better to justify all the hype.

Of course, I have yet to see Steve Jobs’ announcement… maybe his reality distortion field will set me straight :-).

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