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Tag: VC

What Happens After the Tech Bubble Pops

In recent years, it’s been the opposite of controversial to say that the tech industry is in a bubble. The terrible recent stock market performance of once high-flying startups across virtually every industry (see table below) and the turmoil in the stock market stemming from low oil prices and concerns about the economies of countries like China and Brazil have raised fears that the bubble is beginning to pop.

Company Ticker Industry Stock Price Change Since IPO (Feb 5)
GoPro NASDAQ:GPRO Consumer Hardware -72%
FitBit NYSE:FIT Wearable -47%
Hortonworks NASDAQ:HDP Big Data -68%
Teladoc NYSE:TDOC Telemedicine -50%
Evolent Health NYSE:EVH Healthcare -46%
Square NYSE:SQ Payment & POS -34%
Box NYSE:BOX Cloud Storage -42%
Etsy NASDAQ:ETSY eCommerce -77%
Lending Club NYSE:LC Lending Platform -72%

While history will judge when this bubble “officially” bursts, the purpose of this post is to try to make some predictions about what will happen during/after this “correction” and pull together some advice for people in / wanting to get into the tech industry. Starting with the immediate consequences, one can reasonably expect that:

  • Exit pipeline will dry up: When startup valuations are higher than what the company could reasonably get in the stock market, management teams (who need to keep their investors and employees happy) become less willing to go public. And, if public markets are less excited about startups, the price acquirers need to pay to convince a management team to sell goes down. The result is fewer exits and less cash back to investors and employees for the exits that do happen.
  • VCs become less willing to invest: VCs invest in startups on the promise that future IPOs and acquisitions will make them even more money. When the exit pipeline dries up, VCs get cold feet because the ability to get a nice exit seems to fade away. The result is that VCs become a lot more price-sensitive when it comes to investing in later stage companies (where the dried up exit pipeline hurts the most).
  • Later stage companies start cutting costs: Companies in an environment where they can’t sell themselves or easily raise money have no choice but to cut costs. Since the vast majority of later-stage startups run at a loss to increase growth, they will find themselves in the uncomfortable position of slowing down hiring and potentially laying employees off, cutting back on perks, and focusing a lot more on getting their financials in order.

The result of all of this will be interesting for folks used to a tech industry (and a Bay Area) flush with cash and boundlessly optimistic:

  1. Job hopping should slow: “Easy money” to help companies figure out what works or to get an “acquihire” as a soft landing will be harder to get in a challenged financing and exit environment. The result is that the rapid job hopping endemic in the tech industry should slow as potential founders find it harder to raise money for their ideas and as it becomes harder for new startups to get the capital they need to pay top dollar.
  2. Strong companies are here to stay: While there is broad agreement that there are too many startups with higher valuations than reasonable, what’s also become clear is there are a number of mature tech companies that are doing exceptionally well (i.e. Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google) and a number of “hotshots” which have demonstrated enough growth and strong enough unit economics and market position to survive a challenged environment (i.e. Uber, Airbnb). This will let them continue to hire and invest in ways that weaker peers will be unable to match.
  3. Tech “luxury money” will slow but not disappear: Anyone who lives in the Bay Area has a story of the ridiculousness of “tech money” (sky-high rents, gourmet toast, “its like Uber but for X”, etc). This has been fueled by cash from the startup world as well as free flowing VC money subsidizing many of these new services . However, in a world where companies need to cut costs, where exits are harder to come by, and where VCs are less willing to subsidize random on-demand services, a lot of this will diminish. That some of these services are fundamentally better than what came before (i.e. Uber) and that stronger companies will continue to pay top dollar for top talent will prevent all of this from collapsing (and lets not forget San Francisco’s irrational housing supply policies). As a result, people expecting a reversal of gentrification and the excesses of tech wealth will likely be disappointed, but its reasonable to expect a dramatic rationalization of the price and quantity of many “luxuries” that Bay Area inhabitants have become accustomed to soon.

So, what to do if you’re in / trying to get in to / wanting to invest in the tech industry?

  • Understand the business before you get in: Its a shame that market sentiment drives fundraising and exits, because good financial performance is generally a pretty good indicator of the long-term prospects of a business. In an environment where its harder to exit and raise cash, its absolutely critical to make sure there is a solid business footing so the company can keep going or raise money / exit on good terms.
  • Be concerned about companies which have a lot of startup exposure: Even if a company has solid financial performance, if much of that comes from selling to startups (especially services around accounting, recruiting, or sales), then they’re dependent on VCs opening up their own wallets to make money.
  • Have a much higher bar for large, later-stage companies: The companies that will feel the most “pain” the earliest will be those with with high valuations and high costs. Raising money at unicorn valuations can make a sexy press release but it doesn’t amount to anything if you can’t exit or raise money at an even higher valuation.
  • Rationalize exposure to “luxury”: Don’t expect that “Uber but for X” service that you love to stick around (at least not at current prices)…
  • Early stage companies can still be attractive: Companies that are several years from an exit & raising large amounts of cash will be insulated in the near-term from the pain in the later stage, especially if they are committed to staying frugal and building a disruptive business. Since they are already relatively low in valuation and since investors know they are discounting off a valuation in the future (potentially after any current market softness), the downward pressures on valuation are potentially lighter as well.
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Crowdfunding: Hardware Startups Beware

Hardware startups are one area I spend a fair amount of time with in my life as a VC, and while I love working with hardware companies, it should go without saying that hardware startups are incredibly difficult to do. They require knowhow across multiple disciplines — software, electrical engineering, industrial design, manufacturing, channel, etc. – and, as a result, have challenges and upfront capital needs that most software/web companies lack. This has led many angels and VCs to be wary of investments involving building hardware so its no small wonder, then, that many hardware entrepreneurs have turned to crowdfunding websites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to try to raise funds for development.

While crowdfunding can be a great fit for certain projects, I think early stage hardware startups should beware. Yes, crowdfunding sites can generate upfront capital that can fund development, but unlike traditional equity/debt investments (like the kind an angel or VC or bank will give you), “crowdfunding capital” has a particularly onerous type of “string attached”: it’s a presale.

Obviously, the entrepreneurs trying to raise crowdfunding capital want to push their projects towards real sales – so why might a presale be a bad thing? For hardware companies:

  • Raw production costs are a major percentage of sales – so even if you raised $1 million, you probably are going to be able to keep max $500,000 after the cost of materials/manufacturing
  • These pre-sales are oftentimes discounted – so you are generating lower margins on each unit making these particularly painful sales to make
  • Except in a few instances, the number of presales tends to not be high enough to meaningfully change the cost of manufacturing (i.e. upfront tooling costs or supply procurement) – which further eats into the amount of capital you have left to deploy on development since you probably have to pay the low volume price
  • It means you need to keep to some level of deadline. There is a risk that you won’t make your own deadline and there’s also risk that the time pressure might lead to tradeoffs (leave out a certain feature or asset, run fewer tests, etc.) which could hurt your reputation since the public will be getting its first impressions of your company based on that initial launch.
  • It publicly commits you to a particular product even if you learn that your initial idea is wrong or needs tweaking.
  • It tips off the market and potential competition earlier since you likely are doing this at a point before your product is ready and need to provide a fair amount of detail to get supporters.

In the end this “capital” ends up being a very real “liability”, and is a big part of why serious hardware startups that do crowdfunding almost all go back to the traditional VC/Angel community – it is simply not practical to scale up a meaningful hardware business on crowdfunded capital alone.

That said, there are definitely cases where it makes sense for hardware companies to use crowdfunding – and they are cases where the above problems are irrelevant:

  • If your cost of production is tiny relative to the price (think pharmaceuticals, software, music, movie, etc. – trivial cost of production per unit sold)
  • If you’ve already completed the vast majority of development or managed to get capital from another source and are simply using crowdfunding to either gauge customer interest or raise publicity
  • If your intention is to raise money from a VC/angel using a crowdfunding success story (that you’re positive you will get) to show that a large market exists for your product
  • You couldn’t raise money from VCs period and have no other choice

In the first case, a very low cost of production means that more dollars raised can actually go into development, irrespective of volume of production and discounts. In the second case, the pre-sale becomes a good thing: a market signal or a heavily publicized pre-sale for a product which is/is almost done. The third is very risky – because I would maintain its nigh impossible to know if a crowdfunding attempt will “go viral” and even if it does, you are still left with the liability of these presales that you need to fulfill. The last is self-explanatory :-).

If you are an aspiring hardware entrepreneur, in almost all cases your best bet will be to go with traditional equity/debt financing first. Obviously, I am in part biased by my current choice of profession but while VCs and angels can be annoying to deal with and raise money from, the lack of the pre-sale liability and their potential for connecting you with potential hires and partners makes them a much better fit.

Got any questions? Disagree? I want to hear from you!

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